Broken Sword

Broken_Sword_Square

The Broken Sword (Arcade Riven) from League of Legends

I made another plush sword, which I guess makes me a swordsmith. Just, of the plush variety.

The Broken Sword (Arcade Riven) from League of Legends.
The Broken Sword (Arcade Riven) from League of Legends.

This was probably the quickest turnaround for starting a new craft for me (started 3 days after returning from PAX Prime 2015, after debuting my Star Guardian Lux!) It took about a week to complete (weekdays leave little time to work) but it still served as a reminder that regular crafts take a lot less time than cosplay (something about not having to fit everything to your body).

The Broken Sword!
The Broken Sword!

The arcade skins that have been coming out have been so fun that I needed to at least do something about it, like further my fledgling swordsmith career.

The starting fabric palette! A few repeat colors from my Transistor plush.
The starting fabric palette! A few repeat, leftover colors from my Transistor plush.

The broken sword was created pretty much like how I did my Transistor: determining the reference-picture-pixel-to-real-life-measurement ratios. The only aspect I absolutely needed to have though, was that the sword would fit in my checked baggage. The biggest issue I had with my Transistor sword was that it was too long, making it impossible to travel with unless I took it apart, stuffed it into checked baggage, and then sewed it back together after I got to my destination :C I wanted to make this sword travel friendly in case it wanted to travel to a convention with me.

Triangles on triangles on triangles. So many layers of fleece mean very fluffy sword.
Triangles on triangles on triangles. So many layers of fleece meant a very fluffy sword.

One sadness was that the fabric store only stocked 2 different shades of grey fleece, meaning I couldn’t use contrasting grey tones for the actual blade. I tried to get around that by just layering my lighter tone of grey, hoping that the top-stitching would make the accents stand out. Might have worked better with a fluffier fleece, but bearable for these purposes.

Crafting the blade of the sword.
Crafting the blade of the sword.

I stressed for a bit wondering how I’d make a hexagonal end for the sword, but then realized that a sphere would probably be acceptable for a 3D-model hexagon.

Creating the sphere by using a
Creating the sphere by using a “peel” method.

The entire hilt was sewn on with careful pinning and sewing. A lot of extra seam allowance was trimmed off on the inside and the sword turned inside out for a quality check! In order to simulate the dimples on the sword, tiny buttons were sewn on to the triangles (no pictures because I suck).

Assembling the hilt. Proper patient pinning prevents puckering.
Assembling the hilt. Proper patient pinning prevents poopy p’stupid puckering.

The chain decoration was the most improvised part of the sword, but surprisingly also my favorite. The chain links were made from bundles of pipe cleaners stuck into a tube of fabric. I was sure to hide the seam of the fabric on the interior of the chain links to keep them somewhat neat. The star decoration attached to the chain links by a yarn braid, and the entire assembly connected to the ball of the sword using the same yarn braid method.

Putting together the chain assembly!
Putting together the chain assembly!

In order to give the sword somewhat of a rigidity, a 2′ x 1″ PVC pipe was put inside, sandwiched between 2 layers of foam. The yarn braid of the chain decoration was actually routed through a hole drilled into the PVC pipe to hopefully help support the weight of the chain decoration. After some more pinning, foam massaging, and final seaming, the sword was finished!

Best friends. The Transistor may be larger, but the Broken Sword is actually heavier.
Best friends. The Transistor may be larger, but the Broken Sword is actually heavier.

Pattern created by me!
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